A conversation about the Barnett Aden Gallery, the first Black-owned gallery in the US

Elizabeth Catlett print from cover of Barnett Aden Gallery exhibition catalog, Paintings Sculpture and Prints of the Negro Woman December 1947-January 1948, courtesy of Black Art Project

Elizabeth Catlett print from cover of Barnett Aden Gallery exhibition catalog, Paintings Sculpture and Prints of the Negro Woman December 1947-January 1948, courtesy of Black Art Project

The Barnett Aden Gallery, located in the Bloomingdale neighborhood from 1943-1969, was the first privately-owned black gallery in the United States. 75 years after the Gallery’s opening, artist, scholar and curator David C. Driskell will join historian Marya McQuirter in conversation to discuss its history and legacy on Thursday, December 13 at 7pm at the Shaw Neighborhood Library (1630 7th Street NW).

The event is free (see the Facebook event page for more info).

October marked the 75th anniversary of the historic Barnett Aden Gallery. Founded by Alonzo Aden and James V. Herring of Howard University, and located at 127 Randolph Place NW, it was the first privately-owned Black gallery in the United States. It featured the works of such artists as Alma Thomas, Elizabeth Catlett, Lois Mailou Jones, and Aaron Douglas.  

Artist, scholar, and curator David C. Driskell is one of the world's leading authorities on the subject of African American Art. He is also a former staff member, exhibitor, and leader of the Gallery. Dr. Driskell will join Howard University art historian Dr. Melanee Harvey in conversation to discuss the Barnett Aden Gallery's history and legacy. This program is brought to you in conjunction with the People's University lecture series.

This program is brought to you in conjunction with the People's University lecture series.